Deltasone (Prednisone)

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Brand Name

Deltasone {Pfizer}

Generic Name

Prednisone, pronounced PRED ni sone

Prednisone (Prednisone)

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Prednisone
(Prednisone)
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Disclaimer

The information contained in this drug guide is intended as an educational resource only. This guide is not exhaustive and does not contain all available information about this drug.This guide is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment.

The information provided in this guide does not replace the need for the advice and services of medical professionals or the need for medical examination. Always talk to your physician or pharmacist before taking any prescription medication or over the counter drugs (including any supplements) or before making any changes to your treatment. Only your doctor, nurse or pharmacist can provide you with safe and effective advice regarding your drug treatment.

The use of the information in this guide is at your sole risk. This information is provided "AS IS" with no warranties to accuracy or timeliness.

**All trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

 

What is Deltasone?

Deltasone is a medication that is used to treat inflamed areas of the body. Deltasone may be used to treat a range of conditions, including swelling and inflammation, arthritis, asthma, severe allergies, adrenal problems, blood or bone marrow problems, eye related problems, lupus, skin conditions, kidney related problems, ulcerative colitis, and disorders of the immune system. Deltasone is a corticosteroid and can help reduce symptoms of swelling, redness, itching, and allergic reactions. Deltasone may be used for other reasons not indicated in this medication guide.

 

Key Facts About Deltasone

Deltasone belongs to a class of medications called corticosteroids. Your doctor may have prescribed Deltasone for you to reduce your immune system’s response to various conditions that lead to inflammation, swelling and allergic type reactions.

If you have a fungal infection you should not take Deltasone.

Deltasone can weaken your immune system, which makes it easier for you to get an infection or worsen an infection that you already have. You should be aware of this possibility while you are taking Deltasone. Because of the potential for Deltasone to weaken your immunity, you should not receive a “live” vaccine while using Deltasone. Live vaccines include measles, mumps, rubella (MMR), Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), oral polio, rotavirus, smallpox, typhoid, yellow fever, varicella (chickenpox), H1N1 influenza, and the nasal flu vaccine. In addition, try to avoid people who are ill and have infections. Be sure to call your doctor for preventive treatment if you are exposed to chicken pox or measles.

Deltasone is in FDA pregnancy category C. We do not know if Deltasone can harm an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or if you plan to become pregnant before taking Deltasone. Deltasone passes into breast milk and could cause harm to a nursing baby. You should not breast-feed while you are taking Deltasone.

Deltasone may affect growth in children. Tell your doctor if your child who is being treated with Deltasone is not growing at a normal rate.

 

Before You Take Deltasone

You should not take Deltasone if you are allergic to prednisone.

Plan to carry or wear a medical alert ID card stating that you take Deltasone. This will ensure that any medical care provider who treats you will know that you are taking this medication.

Tell your doctor if you have liver disease, cirrhosis of the liver, a thyroid disorder, diabetes or kidney disease before taking Deltasone.

If you have or have had malaria, tuberculosis, osteoporosis, a muscle disorder like myasthenia gravis or a herpes infection of the eyes tell your doctor before beginning treatment with Deltasone.

Tell your doctor if you have glaucoma or cataracts before taking Deltasone.

If you have stomach ulcers, ulcerative colitis, or diverticulitis you should tell your doctor prior to treatment.

If you suffer from depression or another mental illness let your doctor know.

Tell your physician if you have congestive heart failure or high blood pressure before taking Deltasone.

You should be aware that long-term use of Deltasone in high doses can lead to symptoms like thinning skin, easy bruising, changes in the shape or location of body fat (especially in your face, neck, back, and waist), menstrual problems, increased acne or facial hair, impotence, or loss of interest in sex. Talk to your doctor if you are concerned about developing any of these conditions.

 

Deltasone Drug Interactions

You should inform your doctor if you are taking any of the following:

  • aspirin, especially if taken on a daily basis or at high doses
  • cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune)
  • diuretics or water pills
  • insulin or diabetes medications taken by mouth
  • ketoconazole (Nizoral)
  • NSAIDs such as ibuprofen or celecoxib
  • quinolone antibiotics such as ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin
  • rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane)
  • seizure medications like phenytoin (Dilantin) or phenobarbital (Luminal, Solfoton)
  • warfarin (Coumadin)

Other drugs you take that are not listed may interact with Deltasone. You should tell your doctor about all of the medications you use. This includes prescription drugs, vitamins, supplements and herbal products, and over the counter medications. You should not begin taking a new medication without telling your doctor first.

 

Directions for Taking Deltasone

You should follow the instructions on your prescription label and not take Deltasone for longer or shorter periods than recommended by your doctor, or in larger or smaller doses. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose to make sure you get the best results from Deltasone, so you should follow his or her instructions for taking this medication exactly.

You should take Deltasone with food if you are concerned it will upset your stomach.

If you are taking liquid Deltasone use a special dose measuring spoon or medicine cup. Do not use a regular table spoon. If you do not have a dose measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Deltasone may cause unusual results with certain medical tests. Be sure to tell any laboratory or doctor who treats that you are being treated with Deltasone.

You should not stop taking Deltasone suddenly or you may have adverse and unpleasant side effects. Your doctor will need to taper you off of your dosage of Deltasone gradually for best results.

Deltasone should be stored at room temperature, and away from both moisture and heat.

If you miss a dose of Deltasone you should attempt to take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose do not take the missed dose in addition to your regular dose.

 

Deltasone Side Effects

If you experience any of the following adverse effects you should stop taking Deltasone and seek emergency medical help immediately:

  • allergic reaction with breathing difficulties hives and swelling of your face, lips throat or tongue.
  • blurred vision or seeing halos around lights
  • coughing up blood
  • eye pain
  • high blood pressure that is extreme, signs of this include a severe headache, blurred vision, buzzing in your ears, anxiety, confusion, chest pain, shortness of breath, uneven heartbeats and seizure activity
  • low potassium, which includes signs like confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle weakness and a limp feeling
  • pancreatitis, which includes signs like severe pain in your upper stomach spreading to your back, nausea and vomiting and a fast heart rate
  • seizures or convulsions
  • severe depression
  • shortness of breath
  • stools which are bloody or tarry
  • swelling with rapid weight gain
  • unusual thoughts or behaviors

Less serious side effects of Deltasone may include:

  • acne
  • bloating
  • bruising
  • changes in the shape or location of your body fat, especially in your arms, legs, face, neck, breasts, and waist
  • discoloration of your skin
  • dizziness
  • dry skin
  • headache
  • insomnia
  • mood changes
  • nausea
  • spinning sensation
  • stomach pain
  • sweating more than usual
  • thinning skin
  • wounds that heal slowly

It should be noted that this is not a complete list of possible side effects of Deltasone. You should contact your physician for a complete list and medical advice regarding these effects.

 

Deltasone Description and Dosing

Deltasone is available in available in 5 strengths:

2.5 mg, which is pink, round, scored and imprinted with Deltasone 2.5.

5 mg, which is white, round, scored and imprinted with Deltasone 5.

10 mg, which is white, round, scored and imprinted with Deltasone 10.

20 mg, which is peach, round, scored and imprinted with Deltasone 20.

50 mg, which is white, round, scored and imprinted with Deltasone 50.

Initial doses of Deltasone ranges between 5 mg and 60 mg. You should listen to your doctor regarding your specific dosage, which will be tailored to your individual situation. Do not attempt to alter or change your dose without your physician’s consent.

If you believe you may have overdosed with Deltasone seek emergency medical help immediately.

 

Ingredients in Deltasone

Deltasone contains the active ingredient prednisone. Other inactive ingredients in each of the tablet dosages are as follows:

2.5 mg – Calcium Stearate, Corn Starch, Erythrosine Sodium, Lactose, Mineral Oil, Sorbic Acid and Sucrose.

5 mg – Calcium Stearate, Corn Starch, Lactose, Mineral Oil, Sorbic Acid and Sucrose. 10 mg – Calcium Stearate, Corn Starch, Lactose, Sorbic Acid and Sucrose

20 mg- Calcium Stearate, Corn Starch, FD&C Yellow No. 6, Lactose, Sorbic Acid and Sucrose.

50 mg – Corn Starch, Lactose, Magnesium Stearate, Sorbic Acid, Sucrose, and Talc.

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Disclaimer

The information contained in this drug guide is intended as an educational resource only. This guide is not exhaustive and does not contain all available information about this drug.This guide is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment.

The information provided in this guide does not replace the need for the advice and services of medical professionals or the need for medical examination. Always talk to your physician or pharmacist before taking any prescription medication or over the counter drugs (including any supplements) or before making any changes to your treatment. Only your doctor, nurse or pharmacist can provide you with safe and effective advice regarding your drug treatment.

The use of the information in this guide is at your sole risk. This information is provided "AS IS" with no warranties to accuracy or timeliness.

**All trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.