Glucophage (metformin)

Search by Drug or Product Name

Brand Name

Glucophage {Bristol-Myers Squibb}

Generic Name

metformin, pronounced met FOR min

GLUMETZA (Metformin Hydrochloride)

Product (brand)
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
Cart
Glucophage
(Metformin Hydrochloride)
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Product (generic)
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
Cart
Metformin
(Metformin Hydrochloride)
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Product (generic)
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
Cart
Metformin ER
(Metformin Hydrochloride)
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Product (brand)
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
Cart
GLUMETZA
(Metformin Hydrochloride)
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Product (brand)
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
Cart
GLUMETZA
(Metformin Hydrochloride)
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Disclaimer

The information contained in this drug guide is intended as an educational resource only. This guide is not exhaustive and does not contain all available information about this drug.This guide is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment.

The information provided in this guide does not replace the need for the advice and services of medical professionals or the need for medical examination. Always talk to your physician or pharmacist before taking any prescription medication or over the counter drugs (including any supplements) or before making any changes to your treatment. Only your doctor, nurse or pharmacist can provide you with safe and effective advice regarding your drug treatment.

The use of the information in this guide is at your sole risk. This information is provided "AS IS" with no warranties to accuracy or timeliness.

**All trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

 

What is Glucophage?

Glucophage is an oral diabetes medication for people with type 2 diabetes. Glucophage can help to control blood sugar levels. Patients using insulin for type 2 diabetes may be prescribed Glucophage, but it is not for patients with type 1 diabetes.

Glucophage may also be used for purposes not described in this medication guide.

 

Key Facts About Glucophage

You may have to stop taking Glucophage if you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan that uses a dye that is injected into your veins. This will only be a temporary stop to your treatment with Glucophage. Your doctor will advise you of how long you will need to stop taking Glucophage and when you can resume taking it again.

There is a small possibility that you may develop lactic acidosis while taking Glucophage. It is important that you recognize initial symptoms of lactic acidosis because these symptoms may get worse over time and become fatal. Seek emergency medical help if you have symptoms like muscle pain or weakness, a numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, a slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or a feeling of being very weak and tired.

You should avoid drinking alcohol while taking Glucophage, as it can lower your blood sugar and increase your risk of lactic acidosis.

Some patients may need to take extra vitamin B12 while taking Glucophage. Take only the amount of vitamin B12 that your doctor has prescribed for you.

Glucophage is in FDA pregnancy category B. You should not use Glucophage if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant or nursing. We do not yet know the effects Glucophage has on an unborn baby. Because we do not know if Glucophage passes into breast milk you should not breast-feed while taking Glucophage.

Children under age 10 should not be treated with Glucophage..

 

Before You Take Glucophage

If you are allergic to metformin you should not take Glucophage.

If you have congestive heart failure or heart disease you should tell your doctor before starting treatment with Glucophage.

If you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis or if you are dehydrated you may not be a candidate to take Glucophage.

Tell your doctor if you have liver or kidney disease before starting treatment with Glucophage.

If you drink large amounts of alcohol on a regular basis you should tell your doctor. This could lead to a higher risk of lactic acidosis while you are taking Glucophage.

If you are pregnant, think you may be pregnant, or are breastfeeding you should not take Glucophage.

 

Glucophage Drug Interactions

You should inform your doctor if you are taking any of the following:

  • allergy medicine
  • amiloride (Midamor)
  • birth control pills and hormonal treatments
  • cimetidine (Tagamet)
  • cold medicine
  • diet pills
  • digoxin (Lanoxin)
  • diuretics or water pills
  • furosemide (Lasix)
  • heart and blood pressure medications (Cartia, Cardizem, Covera, Isoptin, Verelan)
  • isoniazid
  • morphine (MS Contin, Kadian, Oramorph)
  • niacin (Advicor, Niaspan, Niacor, Simcor, Slo-Niacin)
  • nifedipine (Adalat, Procardia)
  • phenothiazines (Compazine)
  • procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl, Procanbid)
  • quinidine (Quin-G) or quinine (Qualaquin)
  • ranitidine (Zantac)
  • seizure medications, like Dilantin
  • steroids, like Prednisone
  • thyroid medications, like Synthroid
  • triamterene (Dyrenium)
  • trimethoprim (Proloprim, Primsol, Bactrim, Cotrim, Septra)
  • vancomycin (Vancocin, Lyphocin)

Other drugs you take that are not listed may interact with Glucophage. You should tell your doctor about all of the medications you use. This includes prescription drugs, vitamins, supplements and herbal products, and over the counter medications. You should not begin taking a new medication without telling your doctor first.

 

Directions for Taking Glucophage

You should take Glucophage exactly your doctor has told you to. It is important that you do not take Glucophage in larger or smaller amounts, or for longer or shorter than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label and follow any dose changes carefully if your doctor instructs you to change your dose.

Glucophage should be taken at the same time every day.

Glucophage should be taken at mealtime and with food.

While you are taking Glucophage you will need to have your blood sugar checked regularly. Plan to see your doctor often to be sure that Glucophage is working for you.

You will need to check your blood sugar often, particularly during a time of illness, if you travel, exercise more than usual, drink alcohol, skip meals or are under great stress. These factors can affect your glucose levels. Tell your doctor if your levels are not where they should be and you may need a dose adjustment of Glucophage. Your doctor will decide if you need a dosage change, and how much of a change you may need. Do not attempt to change your dose of Glucophage without consulting your doctor first.

Be aware that Glucophage is just a part of a complete program of treatment to help your blood sugar condition. Your doctor may prescribe a treatment plan for you which includes diet, exercise, weight control, foot care, eye care, and dental care, as well as regular testing of your blood sugar. You should follow your doctor’s instructions carefully.

Glucophage should be stored at room temperature, and away from both moisture and heat.

If you miss a dose of Glucophage you should attempt to take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose, or if your next dose is less than 12 hours away you should skip the dose you missed.

 

 

Glucophage Side Effects

If you experience any of the following adverse effects you should stop taking Glucophage and seek emergency medical help immediately:

  • body aches
  • chills
  • dizziness
  • feeling faint
  • fever
  • flu like symptoms
  • muscle pain or weakness
  • nausea and vomiting
  • numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs
  • rapid weight gain
  • shortness of breath
  • stomach pain
  • swelling
  • trouble breathing
  • uneven or slow heart rate

Less serious Glucophage side effects may include:

  • diarrhea
  • gas
  • headache
  • muscle pain
  • nausea (mild)
  • stomach pain
  • vomiting
  • weakness

It should be noted that this is not a complete list of possible side effects of Glucophage. You should contact your physician for a complete list and medical advice regarding these effects.

 

Glucophage Description and Dosing

Glucophage is available in oral tablet dosages of:

500mg, which are round, white to off-white, film-coated tablets and debossed with “BMS 6060” around the periphery of the tablet on one side and “500” debossed across the face of the other side.

850mg, which are round, white to off-white, film-coated tablets and debossed with “BMS 6070” around the periphery of the tablet on one side and “850” debossed across the face of the other side.

1000mg, which are white, oval, biconvex, film-coated tablets with “BMS 6071” debossed on one side and “1000” debossed on the opposite side, and with a bisect line on both sides.

Glucophage is typically dosed on an individual basis. Your doctor will decide what dose of Glucophage is right for you. It is important for anyone taking Glucophage to consult with their doctor for specific dosing pertaining to them. Do not attempt to alter or change your dose without your physician’s consent.

If you suspect that you have overdosed with Glucophage you should seek emergency help immediately.

 

Ingredients in Glucophage

The main ingredient in Glucophage is metformin hydrochloride. Additional, inactive ingredients include povidone, magnesium stearate, hypromelloses, polyethylene glycol 400 and polyethylene glycol 8000.

Back to Top

Disclaimer

The information contained in this drug guide is intended as an educational resource only. This guide is not exhaustive and does not contain all available information about this drug.This guide is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment.

The information provided in this guide does not replace the need for the advice and services of medical professionals or the need for medical examination. Always talk to your physician or pharmacist before taking any prescription medication or over the counter drugs (including any supplements) or before making any changes to your treatment. Only your doctor, nurse or pharmacist can provide you with safe and effective advice regarding your drug treatment.

The use of the information in this guide is at your sole risk. This information is provided "AS IS" with no warranties to accuracy or timeliness.

**All trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.