Diflucan (fluconazole)

Search by Drug or Product Name

Brand Name

Diflucan {Pfizer}

Generic Name

fluconazole, pronounced floo KOE na zole

Fluconazole (Fluconazole)

Product (brand)
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
Cart
Diflucan One
(Fluconazole)
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Product (generic)
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
Cart
Fluconazole
(Fluconazole)
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Strength & Quantity
Quantity
RX Prescription Required  + more info
Disclaimer

The information contained in this drug guide is intended as an educational resource only. This guide is not exhaustive and does not contain all available information about this drug.This guide is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment.

The information provided in this guide does not replace the need for the advice and services of medical professionals or the need for medical examination. Always talk to your physician or pharmacist before taking any prescription medication or over the counter drugs (including any supplements) or before making any changes to your treatment. Only your doctor, nurse or pharmacist can provide you with safe and effective advice regarding your drug treatment.

The use of the information in this guide is at your sole risk. This information is provided "AS IS" with no warranties to accuracy or timeliness.

**All trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

 

What is Diflucan?

Diflucan is an antifungal antibiotic prescribed to treat a variety of different infections caused by fungus. These infections can invade any part of the body including the mouth, throat, esophagus, lungs, bladder, blood and the genital area. Patients with weakened immune systems from cancer treatments, bone marrow transplants, or diseases like AIDS may be prescribed Diflucan to prevent infections.

Diflucan may also be used for conditions that are not described in this medication guide.

 

Key Facts About Diflucan

Diflucan should be taken for the full length of time that your doctor has prescribed it. Do not stop taking this medication, even if you think your symptoms are gone and you are feeling better. Stopping Diflucan too early or skipping doses may cause you to develop a resistance to antifungal medications that treat infections.

Diflucan will not treat a viral infection such as the common cold or the flu.

Diflucan is in FDA pregnancy category D. More than one dose of Diflucan should not be taken if you are pregnant. You should tell your doctor if you are pregnant, or if you plan to become pregnant before you start to take Diflucan. You should not use Diflucan without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby, as Diflucan passes into breast milk.

 

Before You Take Diflucan

You should not use Diflucan if you are allergic to fluconazole, or similar drugs such as clotrimazole (Lotrimin), econazole (Spectazole), ketoconazole (Nizoral), miconazole (Monistat, Oravig), sertaconazole (Ertaczo), sulconazole (Exelderm), terconazole (Terazol), tioconazole (Vagistat-1), or voriconazole (Vfend).

Do not take Diflucan if are taking cisapride (Propulsid).

Let your doctor know if you have liver disease or kidney disease before taking Diflucan.

If you have a heart rhythm disorder or a personal or family history of Long QT syndrome you should tell your doctor..

 

Diflucan Drug Interactions

You should inform your doctor if you are taking any of the following:

  • antidepressants like amitriptyline (Elavil, Vanatrip, Limbitrol) and nortriptyline (Pamelor)
  • alfentanil (Alfenta)
  • blood thinners like warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven)
  • cancer medications like vinorelbine (Navelbine), vincristine (Oncovin, Vincasar), and vinblastine (Velban)
  • cholesterol lowering medications like atorvastatin (Lipitor, Caduet), fluvastatin (Lescol), lovastatin (Mevacor, Altoprev, Advicor), pravastatin (Pravachol), rosuvastatin (Crestor) and simvastatin (Zocor, Simcor, Vytorin)
  • clopidogrel (Plavix)
  • cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan, Neosar)
  • cyclosporine (Gengraf, Sandimmune, Neoral)
  • diabetes medications (oral) like glipizide (Glucotrol), glyburide (Diabeta, Micronase, Glynase), tolbutamide (Orinase), tolazamide (Tolinase) and chlorpropamide (Diabinese)
  • fentanyl (Abstral, Actiq, Fentora, Duragesic, Ionsys, Lazanda, Onsolis)
  • heart or blood pressure medications like amlodipine
  • Norvasc, Caduet, Exforge, Lotrel, Tekamlo, Tribenzor, Twynsta, Amturnide), felodipine (Plendil), isradipine (Dynacirc), losartan (Cozaar, Hyzaar), and nifedipine (Nifedical, Procardia)
  • methadone (Diskets, Dolophine, Methadose)
  • NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) like ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn, Naprelan, Treximet), celecoxib (Celebrex), diclofenac (Arthrotec, Cambia, Cataflam, Voltaren, Flector Patch, Pennsaid, Solareze), indomethacin (Indocin) and meloxicam (Mobic)
  • pimozide (Orap)
  • prednisone (Deltasone, Sterapred)
  • rifabutin (Mycobutin)
  • rifampin (Rifadin, Rifater, Rifamate, Rimactane)
  • saquinavir (Invirase)
  • sedative like diazepam (Valium), lorazepam (Ativan), alprazolam (Xanax), midazolam (Versed), and triazolam (Halcion)
  • seizure medications like carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Equetro, Tegretol), phenytoin (Dilantin) and valproic acid (Depakene)
  • sirolimus (Rapamune)
  • tacrolimus (Prograf)
  • theophylline (Elixophyllin, Theo-24, Theochron and Uniphyl)
  • voriconazole (Vfend)
  • zidovudine (Retrovir, Trizivir)

Other drugs you take that are not listed may interact with Diflucan. You should tell your doctor about all of the medications you use. This includes prescription drugs, vitamins, supplements and herbal products, and over the counter medications. You should not begin taking a new medication without telling your doctor first.

 

Directions for Taking Diflucan

You should take Diflucan exactly as your doctor has prescribed you to. Do not use Diflucan in larger or smaller amounts, or for shorter or longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label exactly.

You can take Diflucan with or without food.

Take Diflucan with a full glass of water.

If you are taking liquid Diflucan make sure you use a special dose-measuring device, such as a dose-measuring cup or spoon. Do not use a regular tablespoon to take your Diflucan dose. Be sure to shake the liquid Diflucan well before taking it.

You should store Diflucan at room temperature, and away from heat and moisture. You may refrigerate the liquid form of Diflucan, but do not freeze it. After opening it and placing it in the refrigerator you must keep it in there while using it and dispose of the remainder after 2 weeks.

If you miss a dose of Diflucan you should attempt to take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose do not take the missed dose in addition to your regular dose.

.

 

Diflucan Side Effects

If you experience any of the following adverse effects you should stop taking Diflucan and seek medical help immediately:

  • allergic reaction that includes breathing difficulties, hives and swelling of your face, lips, throat or tongue
  • appetite loss
  • body aches
  • bleeding easily
  • bruising easily
  • chills
  • clay colored stools
  • fever
  • flu symptoms
  • itching
  • jaundice or yellowing of your skin and eyes
  • rash that is red, severe, blistering and peeling
  • seizures or convulsions
  • upper stomach pain
  • urine that is very dark
  • weakness

It should be noted that this is not a complete list of possible side effects of Diflucan. You should contact your physician for a complete list and medical advice regarding these effects.

 

Diflucan Description and Dosing

Diflucan is available in tablet form in the following dosages:

50mg tablets which are pink, trapezoidal shaped and engraved with “Diflucan” and “50” on the front and “ROERIG” on the back.

100mg tablets which are pink, trapezoidal shaped and engraved with “Diflucan” and “100” on the front and “ROERIG” on the back.

150mg tablets are pink, oval shaped and packaged in a single dose unit blister. The 150mg tablet is engraved with “Diflucan” and “150” on the front and “ROERIG” on the back.

200mg tablets which are pink, trapezoidal shaped and engraved with “Diflucan” and “200” on the front and “ROERIG” on the back.

Diflucan Oral Suspension is available, which will need to be mixed at your pharmacy. It is an orange flavored liquid.

Your dose of Diflucan will depend on the infection that you have. Many vaginal infections are often treated with only one pill. For other infections, your first dose may be a double dose. You should follow your doctor’s instructions. carefully, and let him or her know if your symptoms do not improve

If you suspect that you have overdosed with the Diflucan you should seek emergency help immediately.

Ingredients in Diflucan

The main ingredient in Diflucan is fluconazole. Other inactive ingredients in the Diflucan tablets include microcrystalline cellulose, dibasic calcium phosphate anhydrous, povidone, croscarmellose sodium, FD&C Red No. 40 aluminum lake dye, and magnesium stearate.

Inactive ingredients in Diflucan Oral Suspension are sucrose, sodium citrate dihydrate, citric acid anhydrous, sodium benzoate, titanium dioxide, colloidal silicon dioxide, xanthan gum, and natural orange flavor. After reconstitution with 24 mL of distilled water or Purified Water (USP), each mL of reconstituted suspension contains 10 mg or 40 mg of fluconazole.

Back to Top

Disclaimer

The information contained in this drug guide is intended as an educational resource only. This guide is not exhaustive and does not contain all available information about this drug.This guide is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment.

The information provided in this guide does not replace the need for the advice and services of medical professionals or the need for medical examination. Always talk to your physician or pharmacist before taking any prescription medication or over the counter drugs (including any supplements) or before making any changes to your treatment. Only your doctor, nurse or pharmacist can provide you with safe and effective advice regarding your drug treatment.

The use of the information in this guide is at your sole risk. This information is provided "AS IS" with no warranties to accuracy or timeliness.

**All trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.