Order Prozac (Fluoxetine) Online from Canada

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Prozac {Eli-Lilly}

Generic Name

fluoxetine, pronounced floo OX e teen

Fluoxetine (Fluoxetine (Fluoxetine Hydrochloride))

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Disclaimer

The information contained in this drug guide is intended as an educational resource only. This guide is not exhaustive and does not contain all available information about this drug.This guide is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment.

The information provided in this guide does not replace the need for the advice and services of medical professionals or the need for medical examination. Always talk to your physician or pharmacist before taking any prescription medication or over the counter drugs (including any supplements) or before making any changes to your treatment. Only your doctor, nurse or pharmacist can provide you with safe and effective advice regarding your drug treatment.

The use of the information in this guide is at your sole risk. This information is provided "AS IS" with no warranties to accuracy or timeliness.

**All trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

 

What is Prozac?

Prozac is the brand name of an antidepressant drug made by Eli Lilly and Company. The generic name of the medicine is fluoxetine, also referred to as fluoxetine hydrochloride. It is pronounced as floo-ox-e-teen. The antidepressant belongs to a group of drugs that are called SSRI or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Like other antidepressants,

Prozac is meant to neutralize the chemical imbalance in the human brain that causes depression, anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder or its associated symptoms and panic disorder. Prozac is often recommended as a cure for bulimia nervosa. It is an eating disorder. Prozac is also recommended for premenstrual dysphoric disorder, aka PMDD.

Patients suffering from manic depression, which is a specific and severe type of depression caused or facilitated by bipolar disorder, may be prescribed Prozac along with the generic olanzapine, whose brand name is Zyprexa.

 

Key Facts About Prozac

Prozac can target the various chemicals in the brain that cause or facilitate generalized anxiety disorder, clinical depression, panic disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder. Premenstrual dysphoric disorder and bulimia nervosa are caused by the same chemical imbalance, which is why Prozac is prescribed to treat such conditions.

Prozac is often prescribed alongside Zyprexa for patients suffering from manic depression, especially if they have already been given two other drugs to cure the depression triggered by bipolar disorder but have not experienced any improvement.

Prozac should not be taken if you are currently on Mellaril or thioridazine, Furoxone or furazolidone, Marplan or isocarboxazid, Nardil or phenelzine, Azilect or rasagiline, Eldepryl and Zelapar or selegiline and Parnate or tranylcypromine. These drugs react dangerously with Prozac. You would need to wait for a fortnight after stopping these MAO inhibitors before you can start taking Prozac. If you wish to resume the inhibitors then you must wait for five days after stopping Prozac.

Prozac should not be combined with SSNRI or SSRI drugs including citalopram or Celexa, desvenlafaxine or Cymbalta, venlafaxine or Effexor, escitalopram or Lexapro, fluvoxamine or Luvox, paroxetine or Paxil, paroxetine mesylate or Pexeva, fluoxetine and olanzepaine or Symbyax and sertaline or Zoloft. You should avoid taking trazodone or Desyrel, trazodone hydrochloride extended release or Oleptro and vilazodone or Viibryd. Don’t combine Prozac with Orap or pimozide and Mellaril or thioridazine.

You may experience suicidal thoughts in the initial days of the course. People aged twenty four and younger are particularly vulnerable. Consult your doctor in such circumstances. Do not stop taking Prozac but don’t ignore the suicidal tendencies either. Prozac is not recommended for pregnant and breastfeeding women. Prozac can harm the fetus. Babies may be born with lung and heart defects if their mothers are on a course of the drug during pregnancy.

There are many side effects of the drug. You should always report mild to severe symptoms and seek advice from your doctor. Share any symptom that is new or if it worsens, especially panic attacks, aggression, impulsiveness, hyperactivity, irritability, drastic mood swings and suicidal thoughts. Minors should not take the drug

Do not combine Prozac with Desyrel(trazodone), Oleptro(trazodone hydrochloride extended release) or Viibryd(vilazodone)

Do not take Prozac if you are taking pimozide (Orap) or thioridazine (Mellaril).

When you first start taking Prozac you may have thoughts about suicide, especially if you are younger than 24 years of age. You must tell your doctor if you have these thoughts, and be sure to keep regular appointments with your physician, particularly for the first 3 months of treatment with Prozac.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. Prozac is in FDA pregnancy category C. Prozac can cause serious heart and lung defects for your baby if you take this medication during pregnancy. You should not breast-feed while taking Prozac, as it is known that this medication can pass into breast milk and may harm a nursing baby.

If you have any new or worsening symptoms, like mood changes, panic attacks, trouble sleeping, impulsiveness, irritability, aggression, hyperactivity, or thoughts of suicide or harming yourself tell your doctor immediately.

You should not give Prozac to anyone younger than 18 years old without the advice of your doctor.

 

Before You Take Prozac

Avoid Prozac if you have had allergic reactions to fluoxetine. Don’t consume tryptophan when you are on Prozac. You must not combine MAO inhibitors with the drug. Prozac should not be prescribed to people who have liver cirrhosis and kidney disease. Any history of drug abuse and suicidal tendency must be shared with the doctor before taking the drug. A full medical history must be taken into consideration, especially in regards to epilepsy or seizures, glaucoma and blood clotting or bleeding disorder.

Don’t combine Prozac with other antidepressants, alcohol and any medication for a serious health problem. Consult your doctor. The drug is also known to impair reflex and thinking. You should be cautiously attentive while driving and performing any task that warrants full concentration. Problems with focus and attentiveness are common in the initial days but they subside.

If you are allergic to fluoxetine you should not take Prozac.

You should not take tryptophan while you are taking Prozac.

Tell your doctor if you are currently taking an MAO inhibitor like furazolidone (Furoxone), isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), rasagiline (Azilect), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), or tranylcypromine (Parnate). You will need to wait at least 14 days after stopping your MAO inhibitor before you can take Prozac.

Tell your doctor before beginning Prozac if you have cirrhosis of the liver or kidney disease.

You should inform your doctor if you have previously been diagnosed as manic depressive, bipolar, or if you have had a history of suicidal thoughts or drug abuse.

If you have seizures or epilepsy you should tell your doctor before starting treatment with Prozac.

Tell your doctor if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder before you take Prozac.

You should inform your doctor about any other antidepressants you may take including Celexa, Cymbalta, Desyrel, Effexor, Lexapro, Luvox, Oleptro, Paxil, Pexeva, Symbyax, Viibryd, and Zoloft.

Tell your doctor if you have glaucoma before taking Prozac.

You should be aware that drinking alcohol may increase the effects of Prozac, so you should not drink while taking this medication.

Prozac may impair your thinking and reaction time. Be careful when driving or doing anything that requires you to be alert, especially when you first start taking Prozac.

 

Prozac Drug Interactions

Prozac interacts with Axert, Xanax, Norpramin, Sarafem, Paxil, Tegretol, Equetro, Carbatrol, Plavix, Fazaclo, Clozaril, Voltaren, Frova, Tambocor, Haldol, Motrin, Advil, Indocin, Mobic, Eskalith, Lithobid, Naprosyn, Aleve, Dilantin, Amerge, Feldene, Imitrex, Maxalt, Velban, Coumadin and Zomig. You should inform your doctor if you are presently taking any supplements, be it vitamins or herbals.

You should inform your doctor if you are taking any of the following:

  • almotriptan (Axert)
  • alprazolam (Xanax)
  • antidepressants like desipramine (Norpramin), fluoxetine (Prozac, Sarafem), or paroxetine (Paxil)
  • carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Equetro, Tegretol)
  • clopidogrel (Plavix)
  • clozapine (Clozaril, Fazaclo)
  • diclofenac (Voltaren)
  • flecainide (Tambocor)
  • frovatriptan (Frova)
  • haloperidol (Haldol)
  • ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)
  • indomethacin (Indocin)
  • lithium (Lithobid, Eskalith)
  • meloxicam (Mobic)
  • naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn)
  • naratriptan (Amerge)
  • phenytoin (Dilantin)
  • piroxicam (Feldene)
  • rizatriptan (Maxalt)
  • sumatriptan (Imitrex)
  • tryptophan (sometimes called L-tryptophan)
  • vinblastine (Velban)
  • warfarin (Coumadin)
  • zolmitriptan (Zomig)

Other drugs you take that are not listed may interact with Prozac. You should tell your doctor about all of the medications you use. This includes prescription drugs, vitamins, supplements and herbal products, and over the counter medications. You should not begin taking a new medication without telling your doctor first.

 

Directions for Taking Prozac

Your doctor will mention the dosage, clearly explain the course and also provide instructions at the time of prescribing the drug. You should do exactly as your doctor has prescribed. You should not change the dosage, frequency or interval, do not switch from branded to generic or vice versa and don’t take both alternatively or simultaneously.

Only a doctor should change the dosage or course. You should take Prozac at the same time and you can do so without or with food. You can take a capsule if you have just missed a dose but don’t combine two doses. The drug should be taken every day as per the schedule, unless it is a weekly course. If you miss the dose on the day of the week then try to take a capsule as soon as you realize you have skipped it.

You should not chew, break or crush the capsule. Do not open the capsule. Swallow it as it is since it is meant to have a delayed release in your system. If you have liquid Prozac then you should use the medicine cup or measuring spoon. Don’t use a tablespoon or teaspoon. Keep Prozac away from heat and moisture.

Do not keep it in the fridge. It should be kept at room temperature. In most cases, Prozac takes four weeks at least to have an impact on the symptoms. If you don’t experience any improvement by the end of the fourth week, you should consult your doctor.

 

Prozac Side Effects

The most common side effects of Prozac are aggression, hostile behavior, feeling agitated, allergies including hives, breathing problems, panic attacks, anxiety, bouts of depression and some may be severe, diarrhea, lack of concentration, poor memory functions, fast heartbeat, hallucinations, fever, headaches, insomnia and other sleeping problems, appetite loss, restlessness, hyperactive reflex, rash on the skin, seizures, stiff muscles and tremors. You may experience some difficulty when you walk. Your gait may not be normal or steady. Suicidal thought or self harming tendency is also common.

There are some milder side effects of the drug such as stuffy nose, symptoms of cold, reduced libido, impotence, constipation, dry mouth, drowsiness, dizziness, changes in weight, nausea, nervousness, upset stomach and fatigue. You should always report new side effects or if any get worse with each passing day. Every serious side effect must be reported to your doctor immediately.

If you experience any of the following adverse effects you should stop taking Prozac and seek emergency medical help immediately:

  • aggressive, agitated or hostile behavior
  • allergic reaction such as breathing difficulties, hives, swelling of your face, lips, throat or tongue
  • anxiety or panic attacks
  • depression that has increased
  • diarrhea
  • difficulty concentrating and memory problems
  • faint feeling
  • fast or uneven heartbeat
  • fever
  • hallucinations
  • headaches
  • increased heart rate
  • insomnia or trouble sleeping
  • loss of appetite
  • overactive reflexes
  • restlessness or hyperactivity
  • seizures
  • skin rash that is severe with blistering, peeling and redness
  • stiff or rigid muscles
  • suicidal thoughts or thought about hurting yourself
  • tremors
  • trouble breathing or shallow breath
  • unsteady gait or difficulty walking

 

Less serious side effects of Prozac may include

  • cold symptoms, such as a stuffy nose
  • constipation
  • decreased libido
  • dizziness
  • drowsiness
  • dry mouth
  • impotence
  • increased appetite and weight changes
  • insomnia
  • mild nausea
  • nervousness
  • tired feeling
  • upset stomach

It should be noted that this is not a complete list of possible side effects of Prozac. You should contact your physician for a complete list and medical advice regarding these effects.

 

Prozac Description and Dosing

You may be prescribed Prozac capsules, delayed release capsules, tablets, pulvules or oral solution. The capsules, tablets and pulvules come in 10 mg, 20 mg and 40 mg dosages. The delayed release capsules come in 90 mg dosage. Oral solution comes in 20 mg or 5 ml dosage. The prescribed dosage varies from person to person. Any changes to dosage should be made by the doctor.

Prozac is available in the following dosages in the U.S.:

Capsules- 10 milligrams, 20 milligrams and 40 milligrams

Delayed Release Capsules- 90 milligrams

Tablets- 10 milligrams, 20 milligrams and 40 milligrams

Pulvules- 10 milligrams, 20 milligrams and 40 milligrams

Oral solution- 20mg/5mL

In Canada Prozac is known generically under the names Fluoxetine Hydrochloride and

Fluoxetine as well as the brand Prozac.

The dose of Prozac is based on each individual. Your doctor will tell you what dose of Prozac is right for you and will treat your condition effectively.

All people taking Prozac should consult their doctor for specific dosing pertaining to them. Do not attempt to alter or change your dose without your physician’s consent.

If you suspect that you have overdosed with Prozac you should seek emergency help immediately.

 

Ingredients in Prozac

Fluoxetine hydrochloride is the primary active ingredient in Prozac. Pulvules have inactive ingredients such as silicone, starch, iron oxide, titanium oxide and gelatin. The lower dosage pulvules have FD&C Blue No. 1. The higher dosage has FD&C Blue No. 1 and Yellow No. 6.

The capsules prescribed weekly have FD&C Yellow No. 10 and Blue No. 2 along with gelatin, sucrose, talc, sugar spheres, hypromellose, titanium oxide, hypromellose acetate succinate, triethyl citrate and sodium lauryl sulfate,

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Disclaimer

The information contained in this drug guide is intended as an educational resource only. This guide is not exhaustive and does not contain all available information about this drug.This guide is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatment.

The information provided in this guide does not replace the need for the advice and services of medical professionals or the need for medical examination. Always talk to your physician or pharmacist before taking any prescription medication or over the counter drugs (including any supplements) or before making any changes to your treatment. Only your doctor, nurse or pharmacist can provide you with safe and effective advice regarding your drug treatment.

The use of the information in this guide is at your sole risk. This information is provided "AS IS" with no warranties to accuracy or timeliness.

**All trademarks and registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.